BONOBOS - OUR UNKNOWN COUSINS

2014, Nature, 3rd prize stories, Christian Ziegler, Germany Despite being humans’ closest living relatives, little is known about Bonobos and their behavior in the wild in remote parts of the Congo basin. Bonobos are threatened by habitat loss and bush meat trade.
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25 January 2011 A five-year-old bonobo turns out to be the most curious individual of a wild group of bonobos near the Kokolopori Bonobo Reserve, in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Bonobos: World Press Photo Awards. by Christian Ziegler (Germany) for National Geographic

27 June 2011 A bonobo mother in Salonga National Park, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, shares a large fruit with its child and playmate, while the male (on the left) looks interested but is not allowed to eat.

The Wild Life of a Bonobo - Photo Gallery - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine

14 January 2011 Bonobos, like other apes, build nests to sleep in every night. Here, a female builds a nest just to take a midday nap.

A female bonobo makes a nest so she can rest in the midday heat.

26 January 2011 Bonobos are commonly known for their elaborate and frequent sexual behaviors, mainly from observations in zoos. Here, a male with an erection in the Lola ya Bonobo orphanage near Kinshasa, in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Bonobos (Our Unknown Cousins) by Christian Ziegler

01 August 2011 The Congo River, up to eight kilometers wide in some parts, forms the biogeographic divide between bonobos and chimpanzees.

Salonga National Park, Democratic Republic of the Congo

01 June 2011 A bonobo mother nurses its infant in Salonga National Park, in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Juveniles stay with their mother for a long time and depend on her for social status for as long as she lives.

Bonobos, Democratic Republic of the Congo Photograph by Christian Ziegler, National Geographic

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