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UNITED STATES (Oklahoma / New Mexico) - The Chiricahua Apache Nation - Hattie Tom

Shoshone woman - The name "Shoshone" comes from Sosoni, a Shoshone .

Hattie Tom ~ Chiricahua Apache 1898 (hand coloured platinum print George Eastman House collection) by F.A. Rinehart 1861-1928

Hattie Tom ~ Chiricahua Apache 1898 (hand coloured platinum print George Eastman House collection) by F.A. Rinehart 1861-1928

Plains Apache woman - circa 1890

Plains Apache woman - circa 1890

Apache Girl And Papoose, 1903

Apache Girl And Papoose, 1903

A formal portrait of a young, unidentified, Pawnee man. The Pawnee are a native North American tribe that traditionally lived along the Platte, Loup, and Republican Rivers in the central plains. The name Pawnee comes from the pa'-rik-i word meaning horn, a term that was a tribal mark in which the hair was worn in the shape of a buffalo horn.

The Pawnee were originally residents of Nebraska and Kansas. The Pawnee tribe was forced to move to a reservation in Oklahoma during the late and most are still living in Oklahoma today.

Chiricahuah Apache prisoner of war Isabelle Perico Enjady. Fort Sill, Oklahoma. ca. 1900

Chiricahuah Apache prisoner of war Isabelle Perico Enjady in a puberty dress, Fort Sill, Oklahoma. what they endured!

Chief Naiche (ca. 1857-1919) was the final hereditary chief of the Chiricahua band of Apache Indians. Naiche's name, which in English means "meddlesome one" or "mischief maker", is alternately spelled Nache, Nachi, or Natchez. He was the youngest son of Cochise. Naiche died on March 16, 1919 in Mescalero, New Mexico.

Chief Naiche was the final hereditary chief of the Chiricahua band of Apache. Naiche's name, which in English means "meddlesome one" or "mischief maker". He was the youngest son of Cochise. Naiche died on March 1919 in Mescalero, New Mexico.

Cochise - 1815-1874 Though actually pronounced K-you Ch-Ish, this Apache leader is second only to Geronimo when it comes to that tribe’s historical significance. Often described as having the classical Indian frame; muscular, large for the time, and known to wear his long, black hair in a traditional pony tail, Cochise aided in the uprising to resist intrusions by Mexicans and American in the 19th century.:

Cochise - 1815-1874 Though actually pronounced K-you Ch-Ish, this Apache leader is second only to Geronimo when it comes to that tribe’s historical significance. Often described as having the classical Indian frame; muscular, large for the time, and known to wear his long, black hair in a traditional pony tail, Cochise aided in the uprising to resist intrusions by Mexicans and American in the 19th century.:

Native American prisoners of war 1886-1914 ~ Chiricahua Apache Girl in a puberty dress, Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

Native American prisoners of war 1886 - 1914 ~ Chiricahua Apache girl in a puberty dress, Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

Cochise

Chief Cochise~Apache Indian Cochise was a chief of the Chokonen band of the Chiricahua Apache and the leader of an uprising that began in Cochise County, Arizona is named after him. This county is where my Dad lives now.

Geronimo

Geronimo, The famous Chiricahua Apache Chief - Native American Charcoal drawing from a photograph.

Chief Reynard Faber, of the Jicarilla Apache Nation, is the great-grandsom of Apache Chief Geronimo.

Pinner:: A photo of Chief Reynard Faber of the Jicarilla Apache Nation. He is also the great-grandson of Apache Chief Geronimo.

Indianer-Kinder

Bull Shoes Children, two small indian girls. 1910 by Edward S. Curtis loose hair, one wearing buckskin dress decorated with elks' teeth, one wearing beaded cloth dress.

Hail Stone (aka Stump Horn Bull, aka Spotted Horn Bull) - Crow - no date

Hail Stone - Crow Indian , ca. 1890 - (aka Stump Horn Bull, aka Spotted Horn Bull) - Photo by Frank Jay Haynes. (B&W copy) "The eyes of men speak words the tongue cannot pronounce.

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