The Dacians

The Dacians were the ancient inhabitants of Dacia, located in the area in and around the Carpathian Mountains and east of there to the Black Sea. The present Romania.
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The Helmet of Agighiol is a Geto-Dacian silver helmet dating from the 5th century BC, housed in the National Museum of Romanian History, Bucharest. It comes from the Agighiol area, in the Tulcea County, Romania. The helmet is similar to the Helmet of Coţofeneşti and three other Getian gold or silver helmets discovered so far.

The Helmet of Agighiol is a Geto-Dacian silver helmet dating from the century BC, housed in the National Museum of Romanian History, Bucharest. It comes from the Agighiol area, in the Tulcea County, Romania.

Dacian helmet dating from the second century C.E., reproduced from a relief of the base of Trajan's column.

Dacian helmet, worn by Dacian reenactor Andrei Mihai (Oroles) dating from the second century C., reproduced from a relief of the base of Trajan's column.

Roman statues of Dacians

dacians dacian men dacii ancient eastern european people romania

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Pietroasele Treasure, Romania Dacian culture

Pietroasele Treasure of Romania an eagle fibula (garment pin of Roman times) set with purple stones

Dacian Ceremonial Helmet

Dacian Ceremonial Helmet

Treasures of Romania - Dacian culture Romania

Part of the treasure of Sânnicolau Mare, an important hoard of 23 early medieval gold vessels, in total weighing kg (about 22 lbs), found in now in the Kunsthistorisches Museum.

Helmet  Chieftains Tomb Ciumesti, Romania 3rd century B. C. Iron and Bronze Dacian culture 25cm h. Bucharest, Muzeul National de Istorie

The helmet of the Celtic warrior discovered at Ciumesti (Romania). Celtic elites had ruled over Transylvania in centuries III-II BCE., having a large influence over the Dacian civilization

The shorter variant was called sica (sickle) in the Dacian language (Valerius Maximus, III,2.12) with a blade length that varied but usually around 16 inches (41 cm) long with a handle 1/3 longer than the blade.    The two-handed falx was more of a pole-arm. It consisted of a 3 feet (0.91 m) long wooden shaft with a long curved iron blade of nearly-equal length attached to the end.

The shorter variant was called sica (sickle) in the Dacian language (Valerius Maximus, III,2.12) with a blade length that varied but usually around 16 inches (41 cm) long with a handle 1/3 longer than the blade. The two-handed falx was more of a pole-arm. It consisted of a 3 feet (0.91 m) long wooden shaft with a long curved iron blade of nearly-equal length attached to the end.

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