jan necsulescu

jan necsulescu

jan necsulescu
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The reign of Henry VIII saw the first law against Witchcraft created. The Witchcraft Act of 1541 was the first to define witchcraft as a felony, a crime punishable by death and the forfeiture of the convicted felon’s goods and chattels. Not unlike the nobility, the church owed much of its influence to wealth acquired in the pursuit of property. — The Inquisition initially provided wealth for the Catholic Church and the monarchy.

The reign of Henry VIII saw the first law against Witchcraft created. The Witchcraft Act of 1541 was the first to define witchcraft as a felony, a crime punishable by death and the forfeiture of the convicted felons goods and chattels.

persecution of a midwife - oppression under conservative medieval church

To ignore the history of religious persecution is to denigrate the message of love, kindness, peace, generosity and tolerance taught by Christ. Persecution of a midwife - oppression under conservative medieval church

Boiling.  Executions of this type were often carried out using a large vessel such as a cauldron or a sealed kettle that was filled with a liquid such as water, oil, tar, or tallow. Depending on the intended cruelty, the victim was either immersed before the liquid was heated or plunged, usually head first, into a boiling liquid. In some cases, the executioner could control the speed of demise by raising or lowering the victim by means of a hook and pulley system.

Catholic church boiling Cathars to death for practicing Etruscan version of…

Victim of the Inquisition Undergoing Torture - DS002582 - Rights Managed - Stock Photo - Corbis

Victim of the Inquisition Undergoing Torture - - Rights Managed - Stock Photo - Corbis Oh the times religion made life sooooo much more interesting.

catholic inquisition torture | Torture Techniques of the Spanish Inquisition

The other day, as I was surfing through pictures of medieval torture devices (don't ask), I kept noticing that many such tools were invented by, or at least used in, the Spanish Inquisition.

Many of the accused confessed to these charges under torture, and these confessions, even though obtained under duress, caused a scandal in Paris. The prisoners were coerced to confess that they had spat on the Cross

Thomas Keightley in his Secret Societies of the Middle Ages provides this perhaps too vivid account of torture methods that the Templars were likely to have undergone prior to their “confessions”:

Genocide of the Christian Cathars and Templars by the Catholic church:  Torture Chamber of the Inquisition, c. AD.1736

Genocide of the Christian Cathars and Templars by the Catholic church: Torture Chamber of the Inquisition, c.

Nuns as Torturess

Nuns as Torturess

Medieval Torturess

Medieval Torturess