Cervical vertebrae

Learn about the structure and function of cervical vertebrae, the bones in the neck that support the head and allow for movement. Discover how to maintain a healthy spine and prevent common cervical spine conditions.
Figure 5: Longitudinal Organization of Spine Cord Innervation Peripheral Nerve, Spinal Cord Injury, Spinal Nerve, Nerves Function, Spinal Chord Injury, Med Surg Nursing, Spinal Cord, Sinus Problems, Nervous System

This course describes injuries to the cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral spinal column, including fractures, dislocations, and subluxations of the vertebrae, and injuries to the spinal ligaments. The importance of recognizing and appropriately managing injuries to the spinal column is underscored by their association with SCI. Management via medical and/or surgical care with appropriate interventions and prevention of complications of SCI will be discussed with, hopefully, a return to…

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Christa Carver
Distinguishing features between the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar vertebrae include: a forked spinous process on vertebrae C2-6, transverse foramen and a large vertebral foramen for the cervical vertebrae. Thoracic vertebrae have relatively pointed and downwards-facing spinous processes, a heart-shaped, body, and transverse costal facets on T1-10. The lumbar have thick, stout bodies and blunt, square spinous processes. Basic Anatomy And Physiology, Human Anatomy And Physiology, Anatomy And Physiology, Medical Anatomy, Axial Skeleton, Physiology, Anatomy Bones, Human Body Anatomy, Muscle Anatomy

Distinguishing features between the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar vertebrae include: a forked spinous process on vertebrae C2-6, transverse foramen and a large vertebral foramen for the cervical vertebrae. Thoracic vertebrae have relatively pointed and downwards-facing spinous processes, a heart-shaped, body, and transverse costal facets on T1-10. The lumbar have thick, stout bodies and blunt, square spinous processes.

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