silver rhyton Poroina Romania 500-300 BC riton argint getic mitologie geto-dacica si traca

silver rhyton 500-300 BC romania getae dacian and thracians motifs argint geto-dacilor

silver rhyton BC romania getae dacian and thracians motifs argint geto-dacilor

File:Dacian Gold Bracelet at the National Museum of Romanian History

File:Dacian Gold Bracelet at the National Museum of Romanian History 2011 -

Pietroasele Treasure, Romania Dacian culture

Pietroasele Treasure, Romania late Dacian culture, IV C AD - kg gold dish with feminine figure protruding in the middle. found in Buzau plateau in with other 22 pieces (only 12 are left today) - Muzeul de Istorie al Romaniei

File:Bratara Dacica dacian  gold 4th BC. One of Thirteenth Dacian bracelets stolen from the 24 stolen Orastiei Mountains in Romania and then trafficked and bought back.

One of Thirteenth Dacian bracelets stolen from the 24 stolen Orastiei Mountains in Romania and then trafficked and bought back.

Dacian gold Museum N.de Bucharest- Romania

Dacian bracelets - Gold bracelet with horse heads from Vad-Fagaras Brasov County;

Dacian gold

Dacia was the land inhabited by the Dacians. The Greeks referred to them as the Getae, which were specifically a branch of the Thracians north of the Haemus Mons.

Dacian koson - It is a coin surrounded by mystery. Even though it is Dacian, it has greek writing imprinted on it, as well as Roman symbols and its gold seems to come from the Balkans. Moreover, it can be found ONLY on the Dacian territory. One of the theories claims that, before the death of Burebista, Brutus (monogram?) gave kosons to the Dacian mercenaries that he hired for some wars in the Balkan area. A curious thing about a coin of its age is that it has no leader's face imprinted on…

Dacian koson - It is a coin surrounded by mystery. Even though it is Dacian, it has greek writing imprinted on it, as well as Roman symbols and its gold seems to come from the Balkans. Moreover, it can be found ONLY on the Dacian territory. One of the theories claims that, before the death of Burebista, Brutus (monogram?) gave kosons to the Dacian mercenaries that he hired for some wars in the Balkan area. A curious thing about a coin of its age is that it has no leader's face imprinted on…

Picture of gold bracelets of Dacian origin

Metalworkers in Dacia, an ancient empire in what is now Romania, worked gold into snake-shaped bracelets, which scholars believe were used as offerings to the gods. Photograph By Kenneth Garrett

National History Museum Bucharest - Dacian silver helmet from Agighiol (Tulcea County)

National History Museum Bucharest - Dacian silver helmet from Agighiol (Tulcea County)

Getae-Dacian gold and silver – romanian ancient history | Romanian

Getae-Dacian gold and silver – ancient history

Getae-Dacian gold and silver – romanian ancient history

Image Of The Day - Ancient Dacian Gold Helmet With Piercing Evil Eyes - MessageToEagle.com

Image Of The Day - Ancient Dacian Gold Helmet With Piercing Evil Eyes - MessageToEagle.com

The conclusion of the Dacian Wars marked a triumph for Rome and its armies. Trajan announced 123 days of celebrations throughout the Empire. Dacia's rich gold mines were secured and it is estimated that Dacia then contributed 700 million Denarii per annum to the Roman economy, providing finance for Rome's future campaigns and assisting with the rapid expansion of Roman towns throughout Europe.

The conclusion of the Dacian Wars marked a triumph for Rome and its armies. Trajan announced 123 days of celebrations throughout the Empire. Dacia's rich gold mines were secured and it is estimated that Dacia then contributed 700 million Denarii per annum to the Roman economy, providing finance for Rome's future campaigns and assisting with the rapid expansion of Roman towns throughout Europe.

Dacian Gold Helmet from Cucuteni - Băiceni (Iași County), 5th century BCE. National History Museum Bucharest. Incidentally discovered by locals in 1959 in the village Băiceni, Iasi County, and recovered starting in 1961 by the History Museum of Moldavia. The treasure has a weight of 2.5 kg of precious metal (gold). Composed of a helmet, a bracelet, a belt and a number of brackets.

Dacian Gold Helmet from Cucuteni - Băiceni (Iași County), 5th century BCE. National History Museum Bucharest. Incidentally discovered by locals in 1959 in the village Băiceni, Iasi County, and recovered starting in 1961 by the History Museum of Moldavia. The treasure has a weight of 2.5 kg of precious metal (gold). Composed of a helmet, a bracelet, a belt and a number of brackets.

Dacia -Sarmizegetusa (modern Romania), Koson stater, circa 43 BC, 8.39 gm, 21 mm, 12 h. A hoard of several thousand of these staters was discovered in Sarmizegetusa in 1543. There are two types of these coins, with a BR monogram & without. The type without a monogram was made from native Dacian gold & the type with a monogram was made with Roman gold. Brutus, the lead assassin in Caesars murder, had these coins made to pay Dacian mercenaries in his war against Octavian, Antony, & Lepidus.

archaicwonder: “ Et Tu, Brute Roman Gold Stater issued by Brutus, century BC from Koson, Thrace It depicts Brutus standing with two of his officers when he was Roman consul in Thrace.

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