Detail of Fresco from Pompeii Depicting Bowl of Fruit

Glass vase filled with fruit (detail) , fresco in a room of Poppaea's Villa at Oplontis, Italy

Quails in Wine Leaves, Like the Romans An ancient recipe, using fresh figs, bacon, quail, and grape leaves--surprisingly easy to make, beautiful, and delicious

Ancient Roman recipe- 10 quails, bones in 20 vine or fig leaves 10 medium sized fresh ripe figs 20 slices pancetta or bacon strips Black pepper Cotton threads

Though not much used as a spice today, laurel berries were a very common spice in Ancient Roman times and many Roman recipes call for the use of 'laurel berries'. Interestingly, the English term 'bay' referring to the tree originates from the Middle English baye (Old French baie), which derives from the Latin bacca 'berry' and originally referred to the fruit. The name laurel derives from laurus, the Latin name for the bay tree.

Though not much used as a spice today, laurel berries were a very common spice in Ancient Roman times and many Roman recipes call for the use of 'laurel berries'. Interestingly, the English term 'bay' referring to the tree originates from the Middle English baye (Old French baie), which derives from the Latin bacca 'berry' and originally referred to the fruit. The name laurel derives from laurus, the Latin name for the bay tree.

The first course at Roman dinner banquets was called either the Gustatio or the Promulsio. It was similar to a modern day appetizer and consisted of salad, eggs, fish, and sweetened wine. The next course was called the Prima Mensa, which in itself had six main dishes. In this course, a variety of meat, fish, and poultry was served.

Get your hands dirty & learn to prepare a traditional Roman feast with your local chef. A unique way to taste Roman cuisines.

Cumin and Coriander Cabbage.  Mash cabbage leaves and season them with coriander, onion, cumin, pepper, raisin wine (passum) or condensed wine (defrutum), and a little olive oil. - Apicius, 3.ix.3

Recreating authentic Ancient Roman Recipes and Menus - Come and eat like the ancients!

A large basket, decorated with olive tree leaves, full of big olives, is on the ground. Two trushes, on each side of the basket, are picking at the fruit.  Roman era, Sousse, Archeological Museum of Sousse

A large basket decorated with olive tree leaves full of big olives is on the ground. Two thrushes on each side of the basket are picking at the fruit. Roman era, Sousse, Archaeological Museum of Sousse

Honeyed melons. An ancient Roman dish.

Pepones Et Melones – Ancient Roman Water And Honey Melons

They may not look like much to the untrained eye, but these ancient Roman grape seeds, believed to back to the 1st century A.D., could provide “a real breakthrough” in the understanding of the history of Chianti vineyards in the area, de Grummond says.

They may not look like much to the untrained eye, but these ancient Roman grape seeds, believed to back to the century A., could provide “a real breakthrough” in the understanding of the history of Chianti vineyards in the area, de Grummond says.

Vegetable dishes and salad were often eaten at the prandium. Common vegetables included artichokes, garlic, mushrooms, turnips, asparagus, leeks, olives, beans, lentils, onions, beets, lettuce, broccoli, peas, cabbages, cucumbers, and radishes, and carrots.

Vegetable dishes and salad were often eaten at the prandium. Common vegetables included artichokes, garlic, mushrooms, turnips, asparagus, leeks, olives, beans, lentils, onions, beets, lettuce, broccoli, peas, cabbages, cucumbers, and radishes, and carrots.

Before the Romans learned of lemons, they used sumac for its sour and pleasantly astringent taste. They called it Syrian sumac.   Sumac berries are picked, dried and ground into a coarse powder before being used in the cooking process. This powder is used to flavor salad dressings, meats, rice dishes and kebobs. Sumac can also be mixed with other vegetables such as onions and use

Ground Sumac is the main ingredient in the Middle Eastern spice blend Za'atar. It's made from the sumac berry, and is used in salad dressings, rice dishes, and kebobs. Shop ground sumac at Savory Spice Shop!

Ancient Roman mosaic; 'The Unswept Floor'. This trompe l'oeil motif was popular in Greek and Roman dining rooms.

'The Unswept Floor'. This trompe l'oeil motif was popular in Greek and Roman dining rooms.

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