Ancient Rome

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Pliny the Younger (61-112 CE) was the nephew of Pliny the Elder (23-79 CE), the author of the 37-volume Natural History. He had a remarkable political career, gained a reputation as an excellent lawyer and orator, but he is most famous for his writings. Although only one of his orations, the Panegyricus Traiani survives, his letters, the Epistulae, cover a wide range of subjects and provide insight into the everyday life and concerns of the contemporary elite. Ancient Near East, Ancient Rome, Ancient History, Pliny The Younger, Pliny The Elder, Literary Genre, History Encyclopedia, Chicago Style, Art Sculpture

Pliny the Younger

Pliny the Younger (61-112 CE) was the nephew of Pliny the Elder (23-79 CE), the author of the 37-volume Natural History. He had a remarkable...

Lucius Annaeus Seneca (Seneca the Younger, l. 4 BCE - 65 CE) was a Roman author, playwright, orator, and most importantly a tutor and advisor to the Roman emperor Nero (r. 54-68 CE). Influenced by Stoic philosophy, he wrote several philosophical treatises and 124 letters on moral issues, the Epistulae Morales (Moral Epistles). Ancient Rome, Ancient History, Seneca The Younger, History Encyclopedia, Cycle Of Life, Primary Sources, Roman Emperor, History Education, Chicago Style

Seneca

Lucius Annaeus Seneca (Seneca the Younger, l. 4 BCE - 65 CE) was a Roman author, playwright, orator, and most importantly a tutor and advisor to the Roman...

Publius Cornelius Tacitus (l. c. 56 - c. 118 CE) was a Roman historian, active throughout the reign of Trajan (r. 98-117 CE) and the early years of Hadrian (r. 117-138 CE). His best-known works are Histories and Annals, which cover the history of the empire from the time of the Julio-Claudians to the reign of Domitian (r. 81-96 CE). Ancient Rome, Ancient History, Rome History, Pontius Pilatus, Roman Literature, Classical Latin, Roman Emperor, The Orator, Anglo Saxon

Tacitus

Publius Cornelius Tacitus (l. c. 56 - c. 118 CE) was a Roman historian, active throughout the reign of Trajan (r. 98-117 CE) and the early...

The Eternal City of Rome is one of the places in the world with the most historical sites to visit. The list of ancient ruins, museums, churches, and other historical landmarks makes the city an Eldorado for anyone interested in history. In Ancient Times, Ancient Ruins, Ancient Rome, Historical Landmarks, Historical Sites, Rome Hotels, Piazza Navona, Roman Empire, Barcelona Cathedral

Rome's Egyptian Heritage

The Eternal City of Rome is one of the places in the world with the most historical sites to visit. The list of ancient ruins, museums, churches, and...

Sub-Saharan Africa was explored by Roman expeditions between 19 BCE - 90 CE, most likely in an effort to locate the sources of valuable trade goods and establish. Ancient Egyptian Art, Ancient Aliens, Ancient Rome, Ancient Greece, West Africa, North Africa, Greek Design, European History, American History

Roman Expeditions in Sub-Saharan Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa was explored by Roman expeditions between 19 BCE - 90 CE, most likely in an effort to locate the sources of valuable trade goods and establish...

Marcus Agrippa (by Mark Cartwright) -- A cast of an original century BCE marble bust of Roman general Marcus Agrippa BCE). (Archaeological Museum of Pavia, Italy) Roman Sculpture, Stone Sculpture, Ancient Rome, Ancient History, World Mythology, Marble Bust, History Encyclopedia, Roman History, 1st Century

Marcus Agrippa

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa (l. 64/62 – 12 BCE) was Augustus’ (r. 27 BCE - 14 CE) most trusted and unshakably loyal general and his...

Bacchus by van Dalen (Illustration) - Ancient History Encyclopedia Greek Mythology Art, Mythology Paintings, Ffa, Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Rome Antique, History Encyclopedia, Funny Paintings, Greek Gods And Goddesses, Statues

Saturnalia

The Saturnalia was an enduring Roman festival dedicated to the agricultural god Saturn which was held between the 17th and 23rd of December each year during...

Lucius Cornelius Sulla (l. 138 - 78 BCE) enacted his constitutional reforms BCE) as dictator to strengthen the Roman Senate’s power. Sulla was born. Ancient Egyptian Art, Ancient Aliens, Ancient Rome, Ancient Greece, Ancient History, Roman History, European History, American History, History Encyclopedia

Sulla's Reforms as Dictator

Lucius Cornelius Sulla (l. 138 - 78 BCE) enacted his constitutional reforms (81 BCE) as dictator to strengthen the Roman Senate’s power. Sulla was born...

Propaganda played an important role in Octavian (l. 63 BCE - 14 CE) and Mark Antony’s (l. 83 – 30 BCE) civil war, and once victorious at the Battle. Second Triumvirate, Rome Exhibition, Battle Of Actium, Mark Antony, Equestrian Statue, History Encyclopedia, Ancient Rome, Ancient History, Sculpture

The Propaganda of Octavian and Mark Antony's Civil War

Propaganda played an important role in Octavian (l. 63 BCE - 14 CE) and Mark Antony’s (l. 83 – 30 BCE) civil war, and once victorious at the Battle...

With so much to see and do in Rome it is easy to get overwhelmed. This guide gives direct and simple information to help YOU choose what you want to see and do in Rome. Because we all know, Rome wasn't built in a day and its impossible to see it in one! Rome Travel, Italy Travel, 3 Days In Rome, San Bernardo, Blog Voyage, City Break, Travel Guide, Travel Ideas, Fun Travel

Roman Republic & Empire - Government & Social Structure

Stream Roman Republic & Empire - Government & Social Structure, a playlist by Ancient History Encyclopedia from desktop or your mobile device

According to legend, Ancient Rome was founded by the two brothers, and demigods, Romulus and Remus, on 21 April 753 BCE. The legend claims that in an argument. In Ancient Times, Ancient Rome, Ancient History, Rome Exhibition, Battle Of Actium, Romulus And Remus, Hellenistic Period, Roman Sculpture, London

The Battle of Actium: Birth of an Empire

The battle of Cynoscephalae in 197 BCE concluded the Second Macedonian War (200-197 BCE) and consolidated Rome's power in the Mediterranean, finally...

Cleopatra VII (l. BCE) was the last ruler of Egypt before it was annexed as a province of Rome. Although arguably the most famous. Julius Caesar, Queen Cleopatra, Cairns, Antonio Y Cleopatra, Battle Of Actium, Filial Piety, Ptolemaic Dynasty, Roman Empire, Alexander The Great

Battle of Actium

The Battle of Actium (2 September 31 BCE, fought in the Ionian Sea off Actium, Greece) was the decisive engagement of the civil war fought between Octavian...

The Curia (by Chris Ludwig) -- The Curia. The meeting house of the Senate of Rome. The present building was begun by Julius Caesar in 44 BCE and later completed and dedicated by AuÉ Contemporary Stairs, Contemporary Cottage, Contemporary Apartment, Contemporary Office, Contemporary Landscape, Contemporary Interior, Contemporary Architecture, Contemporary Building, Contemporary Style

Authority in Ancient Rome

Authority in ancient Rome was complex, and as one can expect from Rome, full of tradition, myth, and awareness of their own storied...

The Julio-Claudians were the first dynasty to rule the Roman Empire. After the death of the dictator-for-life Julius Caesar in 44 BCE, his adopted son. Ancient Egyptian Art, Ancient Aliens, Ancient Rome, Ancient Greece, Ancient History, Roman Architecture, Classic Architecture, Architecture Student, History Encyclopedia

Rome under the Julio-Claudian Dynasty

The Julio-Claudians were the first dynasty to rule the Roman Empire. After the death of the dictator-for-life Julius Caesar in 44 BCE, his adopted son...

Fresco depicting two lares pouring wine from a drinking horn (rhyton) into a bucket (situla), they stand on either side of a scene of sacrifice, beneath a pair of serpents bringers of prosperity and abondance, Pompeii, Naples Archaeological Museum Ancient Rome, Ancient Art, Ancient History, Pompeii Italy, History Encyclopedia, Roman Empire, Metropolitan Museum, Deities, Art And Architecture

Roman Household Spirits: Manes, Panes and Lares

To the ancient Romans, everything was imbued with a divine spirit (numen, plural: numina) which gave it life. Even supposedly inanimate objects like rocks and...

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